BioHorizons® DRILLS

1. External hex

Fig. 1

All drills are multi use, external cooling, latch type drills with depth markings (Fig. 1) of 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15mm. Starter/depth drills (Fig. 2) are offered in 2mm and 2.5mm diameter versions with and without drill stops. Width increasing drills (Fig. 3, Fig. 6) are color coded corresponding to the planned final implant body diameter (yellow 3.5mm, green 4.0mm, blue 5.0mm, purple 6.0mm)

Fig. 2

in addition to being inscribed with the actual diameter width in mm (3.0, 3.4, 3.9, 4.4, 4.9, 5.4) of the cutting surface of the drill. Crestal bone drills (Fig. 4) are used to profile a thick crestal bone plate to accommodate the crestal portion of the implant which can differ in diameter from the body diameter of the implant. Bone tap drills (Fig. 5) may be used for dense bone types D1 and D2 to effect an easier implant insertion.

2. Internal

Fig. 3

The same drills are used for the internal implant and the Single-stage implant with the exception of crestal bone/countersink drills. All drills are multi use, external cooling, latch type drills with depth markings (Fig. 1) of 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15mm. Starter/depth drills (Fig. 2) are offered in 2mm and 2.5mm diameter versions with and without drill stops. Width increasing drills (Fig. 3, Fig. 6) are color coded corresponding to the body diameter (yellow 3.5mm, green 4.0mm, blue 5.0mm, purple 6.0mm)

Fig4

of the implants in addition to being inscribed with the actual diameter width in mm (3.0, 3.4, 3.9, 4.4, 4.9, 5.4) of the cutting surface of the drill. Crestal bone drills (Fig. 4) are used to profile a thick crestal bone plate to accommodate the crestal portion of the implant which can differ in diameter from the body diameter of the implant. Bone tap drills (Fig. 5) may be used for dense bone types D1 and D2 to effect an easier implant insertion.

3. Tapered internal

Fig. 5

All drills are multi use, external cooling, latch type drills with depth markings (Fig. 1) of 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15mm. Starter/depth drills (Fig. 2) are offered in 2mm and 2.5mm diameter versions. Width increasing drills (Fig. 3, Fig. 6) are color coded corresponding to the platform diameter (yellow 3.5mm, green 4.5mm, blue 5.7mm) of the implants in addition to being inscribed with the actual diameter width in mm (3.2, 3.7, 4.1, 4.7, 5.4) of the cutting surface of the drill. Crestal bone drills (Fig. 4) are used to profile a thick crestal bone plate to accommodate the crestal portion of the implant. Bone tap drills (Fig. 5) may be used for dense bone types D1 and D2 to effect an easier implant insertion.

4. Single-stage

Fig. 6

The same drills are used for the single-stage implant and the Internal implant with the exception of crestal bone/countersink drills. Each implant system has its own specific crestal bone/countersink drills. All drills are multi use, external cooling, latch type drills with depth markings (Fig. 1) of 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15mm. Starter/depth drills (Fig. 2) are offered in 2mm and 2.5mm diameter versions with and without drill stops. Width increasing drills (Fig. 3, Fig. 6) are color coded corresponding to the body diameter (yellow 3.5mm, green 4.0mm, blue 5.0mm, purple 6.0mm) of the implants in addition to being inscribed with the actual diameter width in mm (3.0, 3.4, 3.9, 4.4, 4.9, 5.4) of the cutting

Fig. 7

surface of the drill. Crestal bone drills are used to profile a thick crestal bone plate to accommodate the crestal portion of the implant which differs in diameter from the body diameter of the implant. Crestal profile drills are color coded with two colored rings (Fig. 7) on the shank of the drill. The bottom color indicates the platform diameter (yellow 3.5mm, green 4.5mm, blue 5.7mm) and the top color marking indicates the implant body diameter (yellow 3.5mm, green 4mm, blue 5mm, purple 6mm). Bone tap drills (Fig. 5) may be used for dense bone types D1 and D2 to effect an easier implant insertion.

5. Laser-Lok 3.0

Fig. 8

All drills are multi use, external cooling, latch type drills. Starter/depth (Fig. 2) drills are offered in 2mm and 2.5mm diameter versions with depth markings of 7, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14mm and 15mm. No special width increasing drills are needed for this implant. The 2.5mm diameter starter/depth drill is used as the final drill. Extended shank drills (Fig. 8) with depth stops at 10.5mm or 12mm or 15mm are offered for convenience. Crestal bone drills (Fig. 4) are used to profile a thick crestal bone plate to accommodate the crestal portion of the implant. Bone tap drills (Fig. 5) may be used for dense bone types D1 and D2 to effect an easier implant insertion.

6. One-piece 3.0

Fig. 9

All drills are multi use, external cooling, latch type drills. 2mmm diameter starter drills (Fig. 9) have depth stops either at 12mm, 15mm or 18mm according to the three available implant lengths. The final 2.5mm diameter drill (Fig. 10) is marked at 12, 15 and 18mm. No crestal bone profiling drills are offered. The bone tap drill is marked just like the final drill with three depth markings indicating 12mm, 15mm or 18mm depth.

7. Overdenture 3.0

Fig. 10

The same drills are used for the One-piece 3.0 implant and the Overdenture 3.0 implant. All drills are multi use, external cooling, latch type drills. 2mmm diameter starter drills (Fig. 9) have depth stops either at 12mm, 15mm or 18mm according to the three available implant lengths. The final 2.5mm diameter drill (Fig. 10) is marked at 12, 15 and 18mm. No crestal bone profiling drills are offered. The bone tap drill is marked just like the final drill with three depth markings indicating 12mm, 15mm or 18mm depth.